CA Domestic Violence Restraining Orders 101

CA Domestic Violence Restraining Orders 101

A domestic violence restraining order  is issued by courts to protect people from threatened or actual abuse from others with whom they have a relationship. California law allows granting protective orders for physical, psychological, and emotional abuse. California Family Law Attorney Judy L. Burger can help you understand more about restraining orders and when you need to petition the court for one.

Here is some basic information about domestic violence restraining orders that you should know.

You can also get immediate assistance by calling the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

Who Can Request a Domestic Violence Restraining Order in California?

Anyone age 12 and older can request a domestic violence restraining order if they have a close relationship with the person who has threatened abuse or actually committed abusive acts. California law defines a close relationship as including individuals who are:

  • Dating
  • Used to date
  • Currently or previously living together in a relationship (not roommates)
  • Married
  • Separated
  • Divorced
  • Co-parenting a child
  • Blood relatives (parent, grandparent, sibling, etc.)
  • In-laws

You may also need an ex parte, or emergency, restraining order. Attorney Judy Burger can explain more about this temporary measure. Call us now for assistance.

How Can a Domestic Violence Restraining Order Help Me?

Why should you file for a domestic violence restraining order against someone? This legal court order provides a layer of protection from harm. The court may enact the following measures against someone:

  • Stop abusive actions
  • Stay away from you (including anyplace you frequent, like home, work, or school)
  • Have no contact with you (including phone, text, mail, email, deliveries, third persons, etc.)
  • Provide support (child support, payments on jointly-owned property, etc.)
  • Grant exclusive use (like a home or car jointly-owned with the abuser)
  • Pay restitution (such as for property damage or medical expenses caused by abusive actions)
  • Relinquish firearms in their possession
  • Attend a treatment program
  • Undergo regular drug tests

The courts may also issue orders relating to child custody, support, and visitation in consideration of the child’s safety and welfare. They may order the abuser to stay away from places the child may frequent, such as schools, daycare, doctors, after-school activities, and more.

Tips for Filing a Restraining Order

Attorney Judy Burger can walk you through the process of filing for a domestic violence restraining order in California. This is often helpful due to the anxiety and fear that often accompanies the circumstances making it necessary. Her experience and confident demeanor are an anchor to help you as you seek stability, relief, and direction during troublesome times.

As you consider what is needed for a restraining order, it is helpful to think of your petition as a blueprint for testifying at a trial. What should be included?

  1. The specifics of the abuse or threats you have experienced. Be as detailed as possible, including dates, times, locations, and other pertinent facts. Think of it as a log of your abusive experience.
  2. Consider the type of help you need. What do you need the order to accomplish? Stop the abuse, prohibit contact, protect your children, provide support or other measures.
  3. Collect evidence to accompany the order petition. Screenshot emails, texts, and social media posts. Photograph damaged items and physical trauma from the abuse. Photograph destroyed property, clothing, personal items like a damaged phone, and other evidence.
  4. Collect witness statements. Record their testimony in writing or digitally.

The more specifics you can provide, the stronger your petition for a restraining order. Overwhelming evidence can also motivate the court to enact stronger protections. Think through the above factors and be ready to discuss everything with Attorney Judy Burger in a confidential consultation. She can also provide further guidance and advice on your next steps.

Get Help from a Certified Family Law Specialist

Judy L. Burger is certified by the California State Bar, Board of Legal Specialization as a Certified Family Law Specialist. She is your strong and aggressive advocate in highly conflicted domestic matters when you need the law on your side. Her encyclopedic knowledge of CA law and astute representation offers the protection and guidance you need in domestic violence cases. The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger has locations throughout Northern, Central, and Southern California for your convenience. Get the help you need to stop the abuse and get on with your life. Call us today.

 

How Far Is Too Far When Considering a Domestic Violence Restraining Order?

How Far Is Too Far When Considering a Domestic Violence Restraining Order?

A Domestic Violence Restraining Order provides significant legal protections for you and your children. These legal orders are specifically for people with whom you have had a close relationship, including family, in-laws, current or former dating partners, current or former spouses, and others.

Filing for a domestic violence restraining order against someone is a big step that should be considered carefully. It is often an emotional and traumatic time, and numerous factors and circumstances can cloud your thinking. How do you know when it’s time to obtain legal protection? Or, how far is too far when considering a domestic violence restraining order?

Defining Domestic Violence

The United States Department of Justice defines domestic violence as follows:

“Domestic violence is a pattern of abusive behavior in any relationship that is used by one partner to gain or maintain power and control over another intimate partner. Domestic violence can be physical, sexual, emotional, economic, psychological, or technological actions or threats of actions or other patterns of coercive behavior that influence another person within an intimate partner relationship. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone.”

Accordingly, you should consider a domestic violence restraining order when you are subjected to behaviors that:

  • Intimidate
  • Manipulate
  • Humiliate
  • Isolate
  • Frighten
  • Terrorize
  • Coerce
  • Threaten
  • Blame
  • Hurt
  • Injure
  • Wound

Such behavior toward you or your children is sufficient grounds for filing to obtain an order of protection. However, keep in mind that the court will need proof that some sort of threatening behavior has affected or is likely to affect you and/or your children.

How Far Is Too Far?

Asking, “How far is too far?” or “How much should I put up with?” before considering a domestic violence restraining order is not necessarily the right question. When you or your child experience abuse or feel threatened, that is the time to act. Contact The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger for immediate assistance with obtaining a restraining order.

You can also get immediate assistance by calling the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

How to File for a Domestic Violence Restraining Order

Certified CA Family Law Specialist Judy Burger can walk with you through the difficult circumstances that prompt filing for a domestic violence restraining order in California. She will help you construct the necessary petition to present to the court. Imagine drawing a blueprint for a court testimony – your petition should contain similar elements, including:

  1. Specific details of the threats or abuse to you or your child. Record all the dates, locations, and other facts you can remember.
  2. Evidence that backs up your petition, like emails, texts, pictures, social media posts, damaged property, or physical marks on your/your child’s body.
  3. Witness or expert statements that back your petition, like doctor’s notes, photos, witness testimonies, and more, in written or digital media.
  4. Ask for what kind of help you need. What do you need the order to accomplish? Stop the abuse, prohibit contact, protect your children, provide support, or other measures.

File the Petition

Turn in your request to the court. A judge may also grant you an ex parte (emergency) hearing and order of protection in certain circumstances.

Serve Notice

The party from whom you seek protection will be served an official notice of the pending court action and any ex parte orders against them.

Appear in Court

You and the other party appear in court to present your cases to a family law judge. He or she will issue orders accordingly.

Get Help from a Certified Family Law Specialist

Attorney Judy Burger can help you more in a confidential consultation. She knows how to take immediate steps to protect you and your privacy and can offer more guidance about what you should do next. Contact The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger at the location nearest you in North, Central, and Southern California to get the help you need to stop the abuse.

 

Emergency Child Custody Issues in California

Emergency Child Custody Issues in California

Petitions for changes in child custody agreements can be filed with the court when circumstances change and new arrangements are needed. These requests are scheduled for the next available hearing on the family court’s calendar. However, an ex parte petition can be filed immediately when you encounter emergency child custody issues in California

Under California law, Family Code 3064 allows the court to temporarily grant an emergency change in custody without waiting on a full hearing under certain circumstances. This is a short-term solution to protect the safety and welfare of the child while more permanent arrangements are examined. Ex parte orders can influence any final custodial orders issued by the court.

When would such actions be necessary? CA Certified Family Law Specialist Judy L. Burger reviews some possible scenarios when emergency child custody issues can be handled through ex parte hearings. She can explain more and review your situation thoroughly in a confidential consultation at one of our offices.

What Justifies An Emergency Child Custody Petition?

California Family Courts typically allow at least a 15-day notice to involved parties before scheduling a hearing about child custody matters. However, when a true emergency threatens a child’s health and safety, the court can issue immediate orders to prevent harmful actions. Ex parte orders, sometimes called “emergency orders,” may be granted in select situations, including:

  • Child abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Neglect
  • Domestic violence
  • A parent’s physical or mental health condition
  • A parent’s arrest for drug use, drunk driving, or another serious crime
  • A sex offender in the home

Your request for an emergency child custody order must include definite evidence that such conditions exist and are a direct threat to the child. Heresy or opinions are not sufficient grounds for the court to immediately remove a child from another parent’s custody. Credible witnesses, photos, videos, text messages, or police reports are solid proof that the child is in danger and emergency orders are necessary to protect the child’s interests.

How Do I Request an Emergency Child Custody Action in CA?

​In addition to demonstrating a clear and imminent danger to the child’s welfare, you must provide several other items of information in your ex parte petition. These include the following:

  • Legal request form
  • Identity and contact information for the other parent and/or their attorneys
  • Current child custody, visitation, and support orders
  • Any previous requests or orders on this or similar matters
  • Reasons why the other parent should not be notified

Remember, you must provide sufficient evidence demonstrating the harm that could be suffered without the requested emergency custody orders. This is also a temporary solution. A formal hearing with both parents may be scheduled for a later date and other orders may be issued as a result.

It is critical that you adhere to California law in all matters relating to your child and custody matters. Emotional reactions to protect your child that violate the law or existing custody orders can complicate your case. Making decisions under stress can place you on the wrong side of the law.

Contact a California Certified Family Law Specialist to Help You Protect Your Children

Consult with CA Family Law Attorney Judy L. Burger immediately if you suspect an emergency custody action is necessary. She can act quickly to file an ex parte hearing petition and the necessary paperwork while helping you gather the required evidence to support your request. As a Certified Family Law Specialist in California, she can help you follow the law and protect your child.

Ms. Burger is not intimidated by difficult or high-conflict custody matters. She firmly believes that children must be protected from abusive, inappropriate, or other dangerous behavior and actions by parents or others. The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger will not rest until your child is safe. We will also work with you to completely resolve this matter in the best interests of your child and family.

Contact one of our eight offices in California today to discuss emergency child custody issues with a Certified Family Law Specialist who is on your side.

How Do Domestic Violence Restraining Orders Work in California?

How Do Domestic Violence Restraining Orders Work in California?

A domestic violence restraining order is a civil order entered by the court directing an abuser to stop harassing or abusing the victim. The type of abuse that may be the basis for the entry of a restraining order includes the following:

  • causing or attempting to cause the victim physical injury;
  • making the victim fear he or she or another person is in immediate danger of being harmed;
  • threatening or harassing the victim, in person or through other means;
  • stalking the victim;
  • destroying the victim’s personal property; or
  • disturbing the peace of the victim.

For the court to enter a domestic violence restraining order, the abuser must be related to the victim in one of the following ways:

  • a spouse or former spouse;
  • a person the victim is dating or has dated;
  • a lover;
  • the other parent of your child;
  • anyone closely related to the victim by blood, marriage, or adoption; or
  • a person who regularly lives in the victim’s home.

A domestic violence restraining order may provide protection for the victim’s children as well as the victim. Such a restraining order can also include other orders besides a command to stop the abuse. For example, a domestic violence restraining order may include an order regarding spousal support, custody, child support, or parenting time; granting the victim possession of a pet; removing the abuser from a home shared with the victim; or prohibiting the abuser from possessing a firearm.

A victim seeking a domestic violence restraining order must file an application with the court. The application includes a Domestic Violence Date of Birth Verification (Form FL/E-LP-640), a Notice of Court Hearing (Form DV 109), a Request for Domestic Violence Restraining Order (Form DV-100 and FL/E-LP-613), a Description of Abuse (Form DV-101), and a Temporary Restraining Order (DV-110). Additional forms must be filed if the victim is also seeking an order regarding spousal support, child support, child custody, or visitation.

If the victim is in immediate danger, the court may issue a temporary restraining order after processing the application but before holding a hearing. Regardless, the court will set a hearing, and the victim must have the abuser served with the Notice of Hearing. Service of the Notice of Hearing is usually done through the sheriff’s department of the county where the abuser lives.

The victim may bring a support person to the restraining order hearing, even if the victim also has an attorney. If evidence at the hearing shows the existence of past or present abuse of the victim by the abuser, then the court will issue a domestic violence restraining order. A domestic violence restraining order can last up to five years but lasts only three years if no termination date is stated. During the last three months of a restraining order, the victim can ask the court to extend the restraining order for another five years or permanently.

If you or a loved one has been or is a victim of abuse, consult an experienced attorney experienced in domestic violence law to help you get a domestic violence restraining order. The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger can help you get the protection you need. Call today to see how we can help you: (415) 293-8314.

Different Types of Restraining Orders in California Family Law Cases

Different Types of Restraining Orders in California Family Law Cases

An important tool to help a victim of threatened or actual domestic violence is an order of protection from the court. This civil court order, called a restraining or protective order, commands the abuser to stop the abuse or suffer punishment by the court. The type of restraining order entered depends on the process used to get the restraining order.

The restraining order entered in emergency situations is called an emergency protective order. A situation is considered to be an emergency when a police officer responds to a domestic violence call or when someone has made a report of abuse to the police. In such cases, the police can request an emergency protective order under California Family Code § 6250. The court can enter an emergency protective order without first holding a hearing, but this type of protective order is only good for seven days.

If a victim needs a protective order for a longer period of time, or if the victim wants to apply for the restraining order without police involvement, he or she may apply to the court for a domestic violence restraining order. Abuse is considered to be domestic violence if the abuser is related to the victim as a spouse or former spouse; a person the victim is dating or has dated; a lover; the other parent of the victim’s child; anyone related to the victim by blood, marriage, or adoption; or a person who regularly lives in the victim’s home.

However, before entering a permanent domestic violence restraining order, the court must hold a hearing, and the abuser must have notice of the hearing. If, after a hearing, the court enters a domestic violence restraining order, that order may specify what the abuser can and cannot do to the victim or how near to the victim the abuser can be. Such an order may also include orders regarding child support, visitation, and custody orders if the victim and the abuser have children together; orders regarding possession of a shared residence or pet; orders for spousal support; or an order prohibiting the abuser from possessing a firearm. A domestic restraining order may be entered regardless of whether the court has previously issued an emergency protective order regarding the parties. A domestic violence restraining order can last up to five years.

If you are in immediate danger, the court may issue a temporary restraining order after processing the application but before a hearing.

If you or a family member has been a victim of domestic violence, seek help from a qualified family law attorney. The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced in helping victims of domestic violence get the protection they need. Call today to see how we can help you: (415) 293-8314.