Category Archives: California Divorce

Why Is a Divorce with Children Usually More Expensive

Why Is a Divorce with Children Usually More Expensive?

Divorce can be an expensive but necessary process. But the average divorce with children invariably costs more than the average divorce of a childless couple. In this article, we will take a closer look at why the costs increase when kids are involved.

Some Issues in a Divorce with Children Can Be Challenging to Resolve

Decisions surrounding child custody and child support are often hotly contested. Demands might be made based on emotions and not reality, as parents use children as pawns against each other. Unfortunately, fighting over children is not likely to end well for anyone.

Divorce typically involves negotiation. A divorce with children usually requires more negotiation than one without. Compromising might be necessary, as long as the compromise is safe for the kids. Refusing to yield even a little prevents the parties from finalizing their divorce. It also usually increases legal fees.

In some cases, the parties will use a family law mediator to help negotiate resolutions. This step also increases the cost of a divorce with children but could remove roadblocks that prevent the parents from moving on.

When Couples Can’t Agree, Trials Often Follow

And trials are expensive. Both parties will incur additional legal fees because their case now could include additional discovery, hearings, and depositions. They might need to hire expert witnesses to provide testimony at trials. Inevitably, legal fees generally increase as attorneys spend days and weeks preparing for trial.

To avoid trial, couples can work closely with their attorneys to prepare a parenting plan. In fact, family court judges will not finalize a divorce with children without one. The parenting plan is also called a custody and visitation agreement or “time-share plan.” In a divorce with children, it’s critical for parents to work out this agreement as amicably as possible to avoid collateral damage to themselves and their children.

You Need Good Legal Representation

As mentioned above, a contested divorce with children requires a great deal more work from your attorney. This is especially true if your case proceeds to trial. Adding an experienced California divorce attorney to your team might be expensive. However, it’s crucial to work with an attorney who can protect your rights and your children’s.

Trust Us to Handle Your Divorce with Children

Contested divorces will always be more expensive to resolve than uncontested ones. Talk to an experienced California divorce attorney today about your divorce with children. Please call us at (415) 293-8314 to schedule a confidential appointment with one of our attorneys.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced at all phases of divorce, legal separation, and annulment. Call us at 415-293-8314 to schedule a private appointment or visit our website. We assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.
Does California Family Law Favor Women

Does California Family Law Favor Women?

Sometimes our fears are unfounded, based solely on gossip or a story told by a friend-of-a-friend. For example, men often fear divorce because they feel that California family law and courts favor women on important issues like child custody, child support, spousal support, and property division. Feeling nervous about an impending divorce is normal and justified. It is a huge, life-altering step. However, it’s critical to understand that California family laws are not biased in favor of either gender.

Straight from California Family Law

Laws relating to divorce are contained in the California Family Code. Courts are bound by these laws, as well as the parties and their attorneys.

Gender is mentioned in the Family Code. In a chapter relating to custody, the law states:

“The court shall not consider the sex, gender identity, gender expression, or sexual orientation of a parent, legal guardian, or relative in determining the best interest of the child under subdivision (a).” (emphasis added)

Judges are strictly prohibited from using gender to determine custody for children. And this law just relates to one aspect of divorce. Gender also should not be considered in other issues like child support, spousal support, and property division.

So, if California family law does not favor women, why do so many people feel it does?

Custody, Visitation, and Parental Roles

The prevailing myth is that courts always give custody and support to the wife. In fact, most parents can work out custody and visitation in their parenting plan. The parties and their attorneys do use California family law to prepare their plan. However, some of the decisions might be based on how parenting roles played out during the marriage, but not solely on gender.

Let’s consider two hypothetical examples. 

Sophie and Jon have two children. During their marriage, Sophie worked full-time while Jon was a stay-at-home dad. During custody and visitation discussions, the couple might decide to retain these roles. If they cannot agree on custody, a family court judge will consider their roles and decide what’s best for the children.

In the second example, Max has a stressful job that requires almost constant travel. His wife, Emma, works full time also but handles all of the childrearing. If Max tries to get custody of his children, a judge might rule against him because of his job. But the decision will be based on what’s best for the kids, not on Max’s gender.

California Family Law and Support

The same ideas generally apply to child support and spousal support. Courts will consider many factors before ordering one party to pay the other. However, gender is not one of those factors.

If we look at our couples from the previous examples, Sophie might be ordered to pay both child support and spousal support to Jon, in part because he has been out of the workforce caring for the children. Even though Max and Emma both work, the courts might order Max to pay Emma’s child support and spousal support based on his income and childcare arrangements.

Property Division in a Community Property State

Under California family law, marital property and debts are split 50-50 between the spouses. Both parties are equal, except in certain circumstances. Gender certainly should not be a deciding factor here.

Talk to a California Family Law Attorney About Your Divorcee

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced at all phases of divorce, legal separation, and annulment. Call us at 415-293-8314 to schedule a private appointment or visit our website. We assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.

Do Movies About Divorce Get It Rightt

Do Movies About Divorce Get It Right?

Be aware that there are spoilers ahead if you have never seen the movies about divorce discussed in this article.

Mrs. Doubtfire – Stability Trumps Whimsy When It Comes to Child Custody and Visitation

This 1993 film starring the late Robin Williams focused on divorce, child custody, and visitation in a poignant yet comical way. As Daniel and Miranda Hillard’s marriage ended, Daniel’s whimsical behavior made him look like an unfit parent. He and his children had a great relationship, but the court granted custody to Miranda. After all, she had a good job and a stable home environment. The court also insisted Daniel clean up his act and limited his access to the kids.

Daniel’s response was to transform himself into an older female character – Mrs. Doubtfire – and get hired to be his own children’s nanny. He and the children became closer until his scheme fell apart, making him look even more unstable. Unlike many movies about divorce, this film ends on a high note. But did the movie makers get it right?

Child custody and visitation are significant points. It seemed the court tried to make decisions that were in the children’s best interests at all times. A stable home life is essential, and Daniel, at first, did not offer this. It made sense to give Miranda full custody and to limit Daniel’s visits. So, it appears that the court did get it right

However, the court may not have considered the children’s feelings on this matter. Although children are not always the best judge of character, Daniel’s kids were close to him and needed to see him. Daniel and Miranda worked out a compromise on visitation that the judge probably would have been approved if included in a California parenting plan.

Kramer vs. Kramer – When Home Away from Home Isn’t Home

This 1979 legal drama is about Ted and Joanna Kramer and their son, Billy. Joanna deserts Billy, leaving him Ted. Unfortunately, she had been Billy’s primary caregiver because of Ted’s high-stress, time-consumer job.

After being gone for more than a year, Joanna returns to divorce Ted and claim custody of Billy., despite Joanna’s abandonment, she won custody of her son.

Joanna prepares an apartment for Billy and then tearfully confesses to Ted that Billy’s true home is with Ted. We don’t see any courtroom scenes as the movie ends soon after, so it’s unsure whether Joanna officially yielded custody or not.

Courts in the 1970s still tended to favor mothers over fathers when it came to custody battles. Movies about divorce did, too. The court here seemed to ignore Joanna’s abandonment and Ted’s stepping up to be a good father to Billy. This may be partly due to something called the “tender years doctrine” that presumed moms should have custody of very young children.

In a California divorce, the courts make custody decisions based on many factors, including what is in the child’s best interests. Abandonment is a serious concern, especially when the child’s other parent is not unfit. A California judge faced with this situation today might have granted sole physical and legal custody to Ted. However, both parents may negotiate a parenting plan and present it to the court for approval.

The War of the Roses – Property Division Can Be a Thorny Issue

This dark comedy shares the story of Oliver and Barbara Rose. During their marriage, they had two children and became very wealthy due to Oliver’s legal career. Finally, though, Barbara confesses she no longer loves Oliver, and they decide to divorce.

The real problems begin when they start splitting up their property. The mansion that Barbara had found and filled with expensive possession became the main point of contention. Barbara kicks Oliver out of the house. Despite his attorney’s advice to compromise, Oliver returns to the home. As their conflict spirals out of control, the couple begins destroying their home, its contents, and eventually each other.

As movies about divorce go, this one captures how personal property division can become to divorcing couples. Sometimes it’s not about the actual property. Instead, personal feelings can get in the way, preventing much-needed compromise.

The best way Oliver and Barbara could have prevented the loss of property and life here would have been to heed the advice of their divorce attorney. Since California is a community property estate, shared assets and debts are split 50-50 with a few exceptions. Attorneys with property division experience could have used California law to help the Roses categorize their property and then amicably divide it.

Movies About Divorce Don’t Always Get It Right. Talk to a California Divorce Attorney About Your Divorce.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced at all phases of divorce, legal separation, and annulment. Call us at 415-293-8314 to schedule a private appointment or visit our website. We assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.

10 Common Reasons Why People Get Divorced

10 Common Reasons Why People Get Divorced

People usually get married because they love each other. But there are many reasons why people get divorced, including the ones listed below.

#1.  They can’t communicate.

Some studies show that good communication is one of the most important reasons couples stay together. But sometimes, spouses can no longer talk to each other, at least about the essential things in life.  When communication is lacking, divorce is often close at hand.

#2.  Couples can’t work together.

Sometimes marriage counselors tell couples to work on their marriage. And, let’s face it, the day-to-day of being married can take a lot of effort. Constant fighting is hard on everyone and can lead people to get divorced.

#3.  Spouses no longer love each other.

People fall into love. But sometimes they fall out of love after the wedding. If the love is gone, it may be time to get divorced.

#4.  They stop spending time with each other.

Sometimes it’s gradual. Sometimes it happens suddenly, but married couples headed for divorce may notice they spend less and less time with each other.

#5.  They realize the marriage was a mistake.

After the honeymoon is over, some couples find that their marriage was not such a good idea after all. And it doesn’t matter whether you got married in a Vegas wedding chapel or after a year of intense planning. It just happens that people find they are just not a good fit.

#6.  There’s an addiction.

Being hooked on drugs or alcohol is difficult, but not just on the person with the addiction. Families also suffer, especially in a close relationship like a marriage. At some point, a husband or wife may find they can no longer handle the challenges of living with an addict.

#7.  Infidelity is involved.

It’s hard to think of anything that could hurt a marriage more than infidelity. Trust is a big part of having a successful marriage. Breaking that trust by cheating is a common reason people get divorced.

#8.  Domestic violence is occurring.

Screaming, punching, and pulling hair are only three signs of domestic violence. An abuser might also demean his or her spouse or withhold money and support. Someone faced with physical, mental, or emotional abuse can find help through a local shelter or domestic violence hotline. For some, divorce is an option.

#9.  They’re having financial problems.

Handling money can stress a couple out more than almost anything. Individuals come into a marriage with different ideas about spending and saving. Couples hit with financial problems like unemployment or unexpected expenses may find their relationship becomes as empty as their bank accounts.

#10.  They are fighting over the kids.

It’s not uncommon for parents to have differing viewpoints on childrearing. Unfortunately, parents may be unable to negotiate and compromise. They may also refuse to participate in family or marriage counseling that has the potential to forge them into a stronger team instead of getting divorced.

If Divorce Is Necessary, We Can Help.

Talk to an experienced California divorce attorney today. Please call us at (415) 293-8314 to schedule a confidential appointment with one of our attorneys.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced at all phases of divorce, legal separation, and annulment. Call us at 415-293-8314 to schedule a private appointment or visit our website. We assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.
What Are Ex Parte Hearings and How Do They Work

What Are Ex Parte Hearings and How Do They Work?

From the time a California divorce is filed until it is settled can take time.  But the parties sometimes require action from the court that just can’t wait. For example, ex parte hearings address emergency matters that need to be heard as soon as possible.

Ex Parte Hearings in a California Divorce

One or more parties may apply for emergency orders in family law cases.  

Courts might hold ex parte hearings for the following reasons:

  • Preventing danger or harm to another party or any children involved in the divorce.
  • Preventing immediate loss or damage to property.
  • Setting a hearing for a time that’s shorter than normal.
  • Shortening or extending the service time for notices of hearing and other court papers.
  • Rescheduling a hearing or trial.

Your attorney will know when ex parte hearings are needed and how to get them.

Applying for Ex Parte Decisions

Not every situation requires an expedited or emergency hearing. However, your attorney can ask for an ex parte hearing for the following basic reasons:

  • Request for an emergency order.
  • Ask to reschedule a hearing or trial.

Generally, applications must contain the following information:

  • Contact information for any attorneys involved in the case or the contact information for any party that does not have an attorney if known.
  • Declarations about facts supporting the request.
  • Lists of previous orders or applications made about the same issue.
  • A disclosure of any changes to the party’s status quo resulting from the order.
  • Specific information about child custody or visitation issues.

The law requires that most parties who request ex parte hearings usually must notify the other parties involved.

The declaration also contains details about how the filing party served the other party. If it was impossible to serve the notice, provide information about all attempts to serve. And finally, the person applying for an ex parte hearing can state any reasons that the notice of hearing should not be served.

We Can Discuss Ex Parte Hearings with You.

As our attorneys work on your case, they will identify any areas that might need emergency orders.

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced at all phases of divorce, legal separation, and annulment. Call us at 415-293-8314 to schedule a private appointment or visit our website. We assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.

 

Tips for Meeting with Your California Divorce Attorney for the First Time

Tips for Meeting with Your California Divorce Attorney for the First Time

Many people have never met with a lawyer before, for any reason. So, meeting with your California divorce attorney for the first time can be a nerve-wracking experience. But there are ways to make things a little less stressful. That’s what we will look at in this article.

Do a little preparation before meeting with your first meeting.

If you can, take a few minutes to consider your goals. Are you definitely seeking a divorce, or are you open to other options? Do you have children to consider? Will you need support while the divorce is pending?

Then, start writing or typing. Make a list of the questions you might have for your California divorce attorney. It’s very easy to forget details – even important ones – during your consultation.

Finally, gather as much financial information as you can. Your attorney will have to file financial disclosures with your petition. If your spouse is filing the divorce, you need to provide full and complete financial disclosures when responding to the divorce petition.

Try not to be nervous about meeting with your California divorce lawyer.

Make sure you know how to get to the attorney’s office. Check routes, traffic, and parking before you leave the house. This simple advice might just help lower your stress level on the day you consult with your lawyer for the first time.

Be completely honest and upfront with your California divorce attorney

Come prepared to talk.

Divorce and marriage involve highly personal issues. You might be embarrassed or uncomfortable sharing some details with your attorney. But remember two things:

  • Your lawyer cannot give you the right advice if they don’t have all the facts, and
  • Your attorney probably has seen people in similar situations and won’t be surprised or judgmental.

The important thing is that you have taken a big step towards a new future. Your divorce lawyer can help you achieve your goals.

Understand what you need to do after you leave the meeting.

You and your lawyer will discuss many things during your first consultation. There’s a good possibility you will leave the meeting with some ‘homework’ assignments.

For example, your California divorce attorney will explain what information you need to file your divorce petition or respond to your spouse’s petition. You might need to gather more information for your attorney.

Also, you might leave the meeting with additional paperwork to fill out.

Finally, your lawyer might give you instructions on things to do or not do while your divorce is pending.

Always listen carefully and help your attorney help you.

Call to Talk to a California Divorce Attorney

The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are experienced at all phases of divorce, legal separation, and annulment. Call us at 415-293-8314 to schedule a private appointment or visit our website. We assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.

Dividing Business Interests in a Divorce

Dividing Business Interests in a Divorce

Many couples own business interests. These can take the form of a business they own, operate, or hold a significant share. When couples decide to divorce, dividing business interests usually becomes a huge issue. After all, property division, which is itself very complicated, becomes even more complex when business assets are involved.

The Preliminaries of Dividing Business Interests

First, it’s essential to know what you are dealing with. Trying to divide property between spouses is impossible without certain information, including:

  • Are the business interests separate or community property? In a community property state like California, most marital property and debts split roughly 50-50. However, is your business separate property – owned by one spouse – or community property – owned by both spouses? In most cases, separate business interests remain with the spouse who owns them.  Community business interests are dealt with differently.
  • Are there any agreements that affect property division? For example, did the couple sign pre-nuptial or post-nuptial agreements? If so, those agreements may address any business assets. Likewise, a buy-sell agreement may address how to handle business assets in the event of a divorce.
  • How much is the business worth? Valuation of business assets is challenging and should not be attempted on your own. You and your divorce lawyer will discuss how to handle valuation, but you will probably need to hire an expert. Undervaluing your business is literally leaving money on the table.

After working through the issues mentioned above, along with any others that apply, you and your spouse can begin dividing business interests.

The Final Decision

Often, couples will use one of the following methods of dividing their business assets:

  • The Buy-Out. One party can buy the other party’s interests rather than dividing them. In some cases, one spouse might be more vested in the business. The problem here is that the purchasing spouse must be liquid enough to complete the purchase.
  • Dividing. The parties could divide the business equally. For example, if the couple owns 80% of the company’s shares, each spouse could take 40%. Alternatively, the couple could split the equipment, accounts receivable, and real property. This might work especially well for parties who own a professional services business.
  • Selling to a Third-Party. In this scenario, the couple receives the cash instead of dividing their actual ownership interests. It’s still necessary to properly value the business.
  • Continuing as Co-Owners. Some ex-spouses may remain so amicable that they simply continue owning and operating their business. This is rare and could be very risky. If the spouse’s relationship becomes rockier after the divorce, they may have to return to court to split the business for good.

Learn More About Dividing Business Interests

Please call us at (415) 293-8314 to schedule a confidential appointment with one of our attorneys. Ms. Burger is a California Certified Family Law Specialist and founder of the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger. We assist clients in California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.

Am I Still Financially Responsible for My Ex-Spouse’s Debts

Am I Still Financially Responsible for My Ex-Spouse’s Debts?

Getting his final divorce order was one of the best days in Jason’s life. Finally, he could move on without his ex-wife and all her baggage. He was unpleasantly surprised to start receiving late notices from creditors and angry phone calls from collection companies. They were about his ex-spouse’s debts, not his. Can Jason be held responsible for these debts?

Community Property – and Debt

During divorce proceedings, a couple’s property and debts are split into two categories:

  • Community, which both spouses own;
  • Separate, which one spouse owns;
  • Mixed Community and Separate, which means the property or debt could be partially owned by the couple.

Property division is complex. It’s not always easy to determine whether something is community, separate, or mixed. In a community property state like California, community property and debts are usually split between the couple. As Jason unfortunately learned, there’s more to dividing debts than meets the eye.

The Nature of Debts

A community debt is generally one that the couple:

  • acquired together during the marriage,
  • one party acquired during the marriage.

Sometimes one spouse will sign for a loan or get a credit card while married but in his or her own name. Then the other spouse uses the debt or helps pay for it. This can complicate the matter further because the debt may now become part of the marital estate.

Couples may simply split their debts in their settlement agreement. In Jason’s case, he took one credit card while his ex took the other. However, when she stopped paying on the card, Jason found he might still be responsible for his ex-spouse’s debt. That’s because the divorce decree generally does not affect the agreement that caused the debt. So, if both parties sign for a loan that one party gets in the divorce settlement, the other party’s name is still on the loan as far as the lender is concerned. Basically, they just want to get paid. That’s understandable but frustrating for the party left paying for an ex-spouse’s debts. 

Talk to a California Divorce Attorney About Your Ex-Spouse’s Debts

Make sure you know where you stand financially when the ink dries on your divorce order. Suddenly learning that you have to pay your ex-spouse’s debts when you are just starting your new life is not ideal, to say the least.

Talk to an experienced California divorce attorney today. Please call us at (415) 293-8314 to schedule a confidential appointment with one of our attorneys.

Please call us at 415-293-8314 to discuss your case. The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Marin, San Jose, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.

Revisiting California’s Date of Separation

Revisiting California’s Date of Separation

Certain dates are memorable in a person’s life. Many dates, like birthdays and anniversaries, are celebrated. But when a marriage is over, and it’s time to file for divorce, another date becomes critical – the date of separation. California law has evolved on this subject, but people thinking of filing for divorce need to understand the effect that date can have on their divorce settlement.

A Simple Term, Right?

“Date of separation” seems straightforward and easy to understand. In a divorce case, however, the date is much more than a square on your calendar.

Courts will use the date of separation as defined by California law when deciding property division issues in your divorce. Here’s what California Family Code Section 70 says:

70.(a)  “Date of separation” means the date that a complete and final break in the marital relationship has occurred, as evidenced by both of the following:

(1) The spouse has expressed to the other spouse his or her intent to end the marriage.

(2) The conduct of the spouse is consistent with his or her intent to end the marriage.

This means that certain aspects of your divorce depend on getting the date of separation right.

Property Division and the Date of Separation

Married couples usually acquire assets and debts during their marriage. Most of those assets and debts are considered to be community property owned by the couple. However, couples often have separate property and debts that only one spouse owns.

During your divorce, it’s necessary to decide what’s community and what’s separate. In a community property state like California, community property is usually split roughly 50-50 between the spouses. There are some exceptions, however.

The “complete and final break in the marital relationship” can be hard to determine. Some couples decide to split but continue to live together and commingle funds. Couples can continue to live together during the divorce, but at least one spouse must exhibit conduct that “is consistent with his or her intent to end the marriage.” Calculating the date can be difficult but is necessary.

For example, one spouse might get a large bonus from work while the divorce is pending. Did this happen before or after the date of separation? If before, then the bonus could be community property. But if it’s paid after the couple is officially separated, it might qualify as separate property.

In fact, division of financial payments, property acquisitions, and so on that occur while the divorce is pending could become complicated if the date of separation is unclear.

We Can Help Sort Out Your Date of Separation and Other Divorce Issues

The attorneys at The Law Offices of Judy L. Burger are well-versed in divorce and the dissolution of registered domestic partnerships. Judy Burger is a California Certified Family Law Specialist and founder of the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger. Please call our offices at 415-293-8314 to set up an appointment with one of our attorneys. We assist clients along the Northern to Southern California Coast.

How Long Does It Take to Get a Divorce

How Long Does It Take to Get a Divorce?

It’s almost impossible to give a one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Just as some marriages last 30 years while others last 30 days, some divorces are fast and others – not so much. However, we can look at the minimum time it takes to get a divorce, as well as any factors that could delay your divorce proceeding.

A ‘Typical’ Timeline

After someone decides to get divorced, the next step is usually to get started on the paperwork. An experienced California divorce attorney can advise on the best course of action and do all the paperwork for you.

So, once the divorce petition is filed, how long does it take to get a divorce?

California has a six-month waiting period, so the earliest you could get a final order is six months after filing your divorce petition. However, you may encounter roadblocks along the way.

Issues That Could Prolong Your Case

You must serve your divorce petition on your spouse. When your spouse is on board with your decision to terminate the marriage, he or she might agree to accept service. However, a reluctant spouse could refuse service or dodge a process server. In some cases, your spouse may live out of state or out of the country, potentially making it difficult to serve the petition.

Your spouse has 30 days from the date served to respond to your divorce petition. If your spouse refuses to answer, you might ask the judge to consider your case a default or uncontested divorce. The judge will review your paperwork before deciding to grant the declaration of disclosure and terminate your marriage.

It can take longer to get a divorce if you and/or your spouse have a high net worth. Property division can become a contentious issue when there is a lot of money or property involved. More negotiation might be involved, and forensic accountants and investigators may be hired. A lawyer with property division experience can help wade through a high-net-worth divorce.

Spousal support can also be a hot issue. Deciding whether one spouse deserves support from the other can be difficult. Calculating the amount of support and length of time it will be paid is often challenging.

Finally, divorces can take longer when children are involved. Both parents must negotiate a parenting plan. If they cannot reach an agreement, they might participate in mediation or attend a court hearing. Any additional meetings or hearings could delay your final decree.

You Need Experienced Legal Advice If You Decide to Get a Divorce

We can’t tell you that your divorce will be final 6 months, 3 days, and 2 hours after filing your petition. We can tell you that we understand the urgency behind many divorce petitions and that we understand all the issues that you will be facing.

Talk to an experienced California divorce attorney today. Please call us at (415) 293-8314 to schedule a confidential appointment with one of our attorneys.

Please call us at 415-293-8314 to discuss your case. The attorneys at the Law Offices of Judy L. Burger assist clients along California’s Northern to Southern Coast, including San Francisco, Beverly Hills, Gold River, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Ventura/Oxnard, and surrounding communities.